Quantcast

SUPREME COURT STRIKES DOWN KEY PART OF 1965 VOTING RIGHTS ACT

 AP

AP

In a decision that marks the end of a major civil rights-era reform, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that the federal government can no longer force states with a long-past history of voting discrimination to have to get federal approval for all of their voting laws.

The 5-4 ruling rewrites a key tool of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which for five decades has given the federal government unprecedented say in everything from how some states draw their congressional maps to where they place polling locations.

But beneath the legal ruling is a broader social significance, with the justices saying that past discrimination cannot be perpetually held against a state.

“The Fifteenth Amendment commands that the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged on account of race or color, and it gives Congress the power to enforce that command. The amendment is not designed to punish for the past; its purpose is to ensure a better future,” Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote for the majority.

The court’s four liberal-leaning justices dissented.

The Voting Rights Act injected the federal government deep into states’ voting practices as a way of combatting states who had a history of laws or practices that discriminated against black voters. Continue reading via The Washington Times...

This NSA Spying is Bad? ObamaCare 'Data Services Hub' to store tax return data for 10 years...

Obama Tells Egypt’s Christians Not To Protest Muslim Brotherhood…