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BREAKING: Concerns Grow About A Nuclear "Incident" In Europe After Spike In Radioactive Iodine Levels

BREAKING: Concerns Grow About A Nuclear "Incident" In Europe After Spike In Radioactive Iodine Levels

Tactical Nuke Detonation or Large Reactor Accident in Russian Arctic

A massive spike in radioactive Iodine-131 over Scandinavia has sent governments scrambling to find the cause.  Radiation monitors are recording 4x increases in radioactive Iodine-131 which can only come from either a Nuclear Bomb Test, or a reactor accident.  The nuclear half-life of Iodine-131 is eight days, so this is an absolutely recent incident.

A U.S. Air Force WC-135 has arrived in the United Kingdom on its way to the Arctic to take samples and readings.  The WC-135 Constant Phoenix is a special purpose aircraft derived from the Boeing C-135 and used by the United States Air Force. Its mission is to collect samples from the atmosphere for the purpose of detecting and identifying nuclear explosions. It is also informally referred to as the "weather bird" or "the sniffer" by workers on the program.

It is possible that Russia detonated Tactical nuclear Bomb in violation of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, or suffered a nasty Naval Reactor Accident in Novaya Zemlya.

Spy satellites used for bomb blast detection do not monitor that part of the planet because there is nothing there to bomb; a perfect place to do an illegal test.


ZERO HEDGE --

Concerns about a potential, and so far unsubstantiated, nuclear "incident", reportedly in the vicinity of the Arctic circle, spread in the past week after trace amounts of radioactive Iodine-131 of unknown origin were detected in January over large areas in Europe according to a report by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, the French national public expert in nuclear and radiological risks. Since the isotope has a half-life of only eight days, the detection is an indication of a rather recent release. As the Barents Observer adds, "where the radioactivity is coming from is still a mystery."

The air filter station at Svanhovd - located a few hundred meters from Norway’s border to Russia’s Kola Peninsula in the north - was the first to measure small amounts of the radioactive Ionide-131 in the second week of January.  Shortly thereafter, the same Iodine-131 isotope was measured in Rovaniemi in Finnish Lapland. Within the next two weeks, traces of radioactivity, although in tiny amounts, were measured in Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, France and Spain.

Norway was the first to measure the radioactivity, but France was the first to officially inform the public about it.

"Iodine-131 a radionuclide of anthropogenic origin, has recently been detected in tiny amounts in the ground-level atmosphere in Europe. The preliminary report states it was first found during week 2 of January 2017 in northern Norway. Iodine-131 was also detected in Finland, Poland, Czech Republic, Germany, France and Spain, until the end of January", the official French Institute de Radioprotection et de Süreté Nucléaire (IRSN) wrote in a press release.

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