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Boston Globe Makes a Big Deal Picking Apart Melania Trump’s White House Portrait, Gets Owned on Twitter

Boston Globe Makes a Big Deal Picking Apart Melania Trump’s White House Portrait, Gets Owned on Twitter

THE DAILY SHEEPLE --

Melania Trump’s official White House portrait has been released. Here it is above...

And… she looks like a model. Probably because she used to be one. So?

The Boston Globe immediately picked the whole thing apart top to bottom.

From the 25-carat diamond ring President Trump bought Melania for their 10-year wedding anniversary “worth more than most Americans would make in 10 lifetimes” to the fact that she’s “not really smiling” like other first ladies or that her “cool, distant gaze seems to evoke her runway-model past more than her current role as the country’s first lady,” the Globe found all kinds of reasons why Melania’s White House portrait sucks.

That, and she… wait for it… crossed her arms:

Boston portrait photographer Ryuji Suzuki, of Beaupix Studio , immediately noticed the first lady’s crossed arms and distant gaze in the new portrait.

“There are different opinions about people crossing their arms in portraits,” he said. “If you do it right, you might add a powerful impression, but it often gives you distance. If you want to be friendly and approachable you probably wouldn’t pose like this.”

Like an excited little kid that gets his mom to display his latest finger painting up on the fridge, the Globe then shared the article of the controversy of Melania’s White House portrait on Twitter, zeroing in on her pose of all things and asking, “So what’s with the crossed arms?”

…and that’s when they got owned.

Because… no one ever crosses his or her arms in pictures, right?

Thanks Boston Globe.



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