Quantcast
Erdogan has a trump card against Putin that would transform the Syrian war

Erdogan has a trump card against Putin that would transform the Syrian war

By Natasha Bertrand | Business Insider via Yahoo News

Turkish Navy ships are anchored in Istanbul's Bosporus strait, Turkey, Saturday, June 26, 2004,

Following the downing of a Russian warplane last week by Turkey, Russia has shown no signs of letting up on its military operations near the Turkish-Syrian border.


Prior to the incident, Moscow ignored calls by Ankara to put an "immediate end" to its airstrikes on Turkmen rebel brigades operating along the border.

The tension culminated in Turkey's decision to down the Su-24 fighter jet, which had been bombing units of Liwa Jabal al-Turkman — an ethnic Turkish group backed by Turkey — at the time it was downed.

Russia insisted the plane had been bombing "terrorists" in the area.

Burned by the incident, Russia deployed an advanced S-400 surface-to-air missile system to the coastal province of Latakia and ordered that all Russian Su-24s be equipped with air-to-air missiles. Russian warplanes have continued pounding Turkmen rebels — the Turkish aid convoys along the border that supply them — with airstrikes.

These provocative moves are evidently meant as a message to deter Turkish jets from shooting down Russian planes in the future. But Russia has financial and geopolitical interests in keeping its retaliation asymmetrical — specifically, by bombing Turkish-backed rebel groups in Syria while refraining from engaging with Turkey in a military confrontation directly.

BREAKING -- Obama's Top General Just Broke Ranks To Expose Obama's ISIS Lie [VIDEO]

BREAKING -- Obama's Top General Just Broke Ranks To Expose Obama's ISIS Lie [VIDEO]

Iraqi Shi'ite militias pledge to fight U.S. forces if deployed

Iraqi Shi'ite militias pledge to fight U.S. forces if deployed